samwolk:

In honor of #NationalCoffeeDay, here are 9 of my Star Wars coffee cups from the past few years.

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red-lipstick:

Marta Klonowska (b. 1964, Warsaw, Poland) - Animal sculptures made from shattered glass pieces. Represented by: Lorch + Seide Gallery.

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tagged by bencumber (thank u bb!)

Rules: Once you’ve been tagged, you are supposed to write a note with 92 Truths about you. At the end, choose 25 people to be tagged. You have to tag the person who tagged you 

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#me  #memes 


no, you don’t understand, me and freddie prinze jr were like best friends on twitter this week
this wasn’t even everything, there were more tweets than this

no, you don’t understand, me and freddie prinze jr were like best friends on twitter this week

this wasn’t even everything, there were more tweets than this

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so this week has been interesting

so this week has been interesting

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"It’s good to know that other people think differently, and that’s what makes the characters interesting.”
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Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.
— Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)
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